ANZAC Day 2018: Remembering ANZAC nurses

Australian Staff Nurses in the grounds of No 1 Australian Auxiliary Hospital, Harefield, England

Written by Helen Le

During WWI, so many brave Australian nurses worked in hospitals, hospital ships and trains and in casualty clearing stations close to the front line to treat wounded Australian soldiers. These women were extremely committed, putting their lives at risk to help as much as they could throughout the war. On top of treating soldiers’ injuries, they also provided a more comfortable environment through warm blankets and hot drinks, reduced shock of their patients, alleviated dehydration and excessive blood loss, prevented infections such as pneumonia and did their best to ease soldiers’ depression and anxiety.

While treating their patients, they had to work in appalling surroundings such as being out in the open or under tents with limited medical supplies, in a traumatic environment which prompted little rest, and an eternal fear of dying or losing their patients at any second due to bomb attacks. While in service, they were also suffering from conditions including malaria, dysentery, gangrene and frostbite.

We are extremely thankful for these incredible nurses who tirelessly worked and constantly put their lives on the line in the line of duty.

We will never forget their hard work and sacrifice.

Lest we forget.